Safari Camp Stories: History in the Making

by Sophie Barrett, guide at Garonga

A game reserve is a place where unique moments happen on a daily basis. At any time seeing a particular creature, behaviour or interaction might be a first for either guest or guide. A game reserve is a place of wonder, a place where the definition of impossible is ‘it could happen tomorrow’. In such a place how do you decide which moments are everyday wonders and which are wonders for the history books? Usually this is a topic of hot and heavy debate, but recently here at Garonga we were all able to agree that one first was truly a first that will go down in the history of the reserve…

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Take a Walking Safari on the Wild Side

Ditch the four wheels of the game vehicle for your own two feet on a walking safari in the middle of South Africa’s bushveld.

Our home, the Greater Makalali Private Nature Reserve, is a beautiful wilderness area that is bursting with life that is big, small and, of course, creatures that fall somewhere in between.

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Guides’ Wildlife Photo Competition Winners

Along with the photo competition that guests from both Garonga Safari Camp and Little Garonga can submit their safari moments to, we have also started an annual Wildlife Photo Competition for our guide and tracker teams. The teams: Jaffet and Richard; Josia and Phineas; Samantha and Stewart; Derrick and Kaizer; and Sophie and Bongi, get to explore the bush daily on a game drive or on foot, regularly experiencing fantastic sightings, which make for great photographic opportunities.

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Safari Camp Stories: Following a Cheetah Hunt

by Derrick Nyathi and Kaizer Mathebula, guide and tracker at Garonga

It was one of those mornings where the bush was alive and bristling with activity. We could barely move without seeing animals.

After a few days of careful tracking, we had found a young female cheetah. We enjoyed a lovely relaxed sighting where she was lying down, looking to all the world like she was fast asleep when, suddenly, her head popped up. With her incredible sense of hearing she had heard something moving through the bush.

Cheetah Hunt, Cheetah, Safari Camp Stories, South Africa Safari, Africa Safari
© Derrick Nyathi and Kaizer Mathebula

Gone was her lazy demeanour as she was up and stalking through the bush in one single movement. To us it was a mystery what she had heard; a cheetah’s hearing is far more acute than a human’s and we could neither see nor hear what she was following. Whatever it was though was clearly something delicious!

Whilst we were following her, she put on a burst of speed and disappeared! And so the search for her began again. We picked up her tracks and then in the background we heard the impalas’ alarm calling so we had our direction and raced off! Unfortunately, as a young cheetah, she was still learning to perfect her hunting technique. She had detected a bachelor herd of impalas, stalked them excellently but had gotten ahead of herself and become exposed.

Cheetah Hunt, Cheetah, Safari Camp Stories, South Africa Safari, Africa Safari
© Derrick Nyathi and Kaizer Mathebula

Like their big cat predators, impalas also have fantastic senses. As an animal that is on everyone’s menu, they have to be constantly on alert and luckily for the males that morning, they had spotted the hungry female cheetah as she approached them. After spotting her they sounded their alarm call, which let both the cheetah and us know that the impalas had seen her and the jig was up!

At this point, the cheetah had no choice but to move off as the noise was likely to draw the attention of other predators. That could be very dangerous for the cheetah because any of those predators entering the scene would see her as competition for food and attack her.

Cheetah Hunt, Cheetah, Safari Camp Stories, South Africa Safari, Africa Safari
© Derrick Nyathi and Kaizer Mathebula

Looking sad that she hadn’t managed to catch herself a tasty breakfast, she skulked off into the bushes to try her luck somewhere else.

Safari Camp Stories: Hanging Out with the Garonga Pride

by Samantha Hewitt, guide at Garonga

One morning in mid-January, on a game drive with guests, we spotted some tracks of the two dominant male lions of the Garonga pride but didn’t follow up as they were walking in a very thick area that we decided was too dangerous for us to venture into.

Safari Camp Stories, Garonga, South African Safari, Big 5 Animals, Big 5 Safari, Lions
© Samantha Hewitt

In the afternoon, we set off with the idea that we would drive around the area where we had seen the male lion tracks. As we left the lodge it started raining so I turned around to the guests to tell them that with the rain the chances of us trying to track the two male lions would be extremely difficult as the rain ages and washes the tracks away.

We went to the area where we last saw the tracks of the male lions but couldn’t see if they had crossed any road; at this point, the tracks no longer looked like tracks but just a bunch of raindrops. An elephant bull had been called in on the radio and we had already decided that if our gut feeling wasn’t right after checking one last road in that area, we would go to the elephant bull.

Safari Camp Stories, Garonga, South African Safari, Big 5 Animals, Big 5 Safari, Lions
© Samantha Hewitt

As we were driving, Stuart, and his amazing ability to spot animals from miles away, turned around with a huge grin on his face saying “Lion! Males! Two of them!” As you can imagine, the guests were so excited, and I was shocked that without tracking we had still managed to find these male lions!

Safari Camp Stories, Garonga, South African Safari, Big 5 Animals, Big 5 Safari, Lions
© Samantha Hewitt

As we drove a little closer Stuart smiled and said, “and the Garonga pride!”.

Safari Camp Stories, Garonga, South African Safari, Big 5 Animals, Big 5 Safari, Lions
© Samantha Hewitt

We sat in amazement as the six cubs played with one another, the mothers looking up from time to time making sure that the older cubs, that are about seven months now, were not being too rough with the younger cubs that are now around four and two months old.

Safari Camp Stories, Garonga, South African Safari, Big 5 Animals, Big 5 Safari, Lions
© Samantha Hewitt

The males got up a few times to change their position, which allowed us to take some fantastic photos.

Safari Camp Stories, Garonga, South African Safari, Big 5 Animals, Big 5 Safari, Lions
© Samantha Hewitt

It was a wonderful drive after all, even if we did get a little wet and saw very few impala!